Oklahoma Ag in the Classroom

Barnyard Animals

Chickens, Ducks and Turkeys

Cows

Goats and Sheep

Horses and Mules

Pigs

Songs and Poems About Farm Animals

Barnyard Animals

Mi Chacra (My Farm)

Sing this song using flash cards, with pictures of the animals and their Spanish names. Use the song with “Barnyard Bingo.”

Spanish:
Vengan a ver mi chacra que es hermosa,
Vengan a ver mi chacra que es hermosa,
El pollito hace así: peep, peep!
El pollito hace así: peep, peep!
O va camarad', O va camarad',
O va, O va, O va!
O va camarad', O va camarad',
O va, O va, O va!

English:
Come and see my farm which is so beautiful,
Come and see my farm which is so beautiful,
Little chicken goes like this: peep, peep!
Little chicken goes like this: peep, peep!
O come my friend, O come my friend,
O come, O come, O come!
O come my friend, O come my friend,
O come, O come, O come!

Other verses:
El patito (the duckling) hace así: quack, quack!

El caballo (the horse) hace así: neigh, neigh!

Lechoncito (piglet) hace así: oink, oink!

Y el burro (and the donkey) hace así: hee-haw!

El osito (the little bear) hace así: grr, grr!

El gatito (the kitten) hace así: meow, meow!
Lechucito (owlet) hace así: Whoo, whoo!

Y el toro (and the bull) hace así: snort, snort!

Chickens, Ducks and Turkeys

The Chickens

Said the first little chicken, with a strange little squirm,
"I wish I could find a fat little worm."

Said the next little chicken, with an odd little shrug:
"I wish I could find fat little bug."

Said a third little chicken, with a small sigh of grief,
"I wish I could find a green little leaf!"

Said the fourth little chicken, with a faint little moan,
"I wish I could find a wee gravel stone."

"See here!" said the mother, from the green garden patch,
"If you want any breakfast, just come here and scratch!"

I Had a Little Chickie

I had a little chickie
She wouldn't lay an egg;
So I poured hot water
Up and down her leg,
The little chickie cried
The little chickie begged;
The little chickie finally laid
A hard-boiled egg!

The Little White Duck


There's a little white duck (quack)
Sitting in the water.
A little white duck (quack)
Doing what he oughter.
He took a bite of a lily pad,
Flapped his wings and he said,
"I'm glad I'm a little white duck,
Sitting in the water."
Quack, Quack, Quack.

There's a little green frog (glumph)
Swimming in the water.
A little green frog (glumph)
Doin' what he oughta.
He jumped right off of the lily pad
The little duck bit.
And he said "I'm glad,
I'm a little green frog,
Swimming in the water,
Glumph, Glumph, Glumph."

There's a little black bug (bzz)
Floating on the water.
A little black bug (bzz)
Doing what he oughter.
He tickled the frog on the lily pad
That the little duck bit.
And he said, "I'm glad,
I'm a little black bug,
Floating on the water.
Bzz! Guzz! Bzz!"

There's a little red snake (hiss)
Playing in the water.
A little red snake (hiss)
Doing what he oughter,
He frightened the duck and the frog so bad,
He ate the little bug,
And he said, "I'm glad
I'm a little red snake,
Playing in the water.
Hiss, Hiss, Hiss."

Now there's nobody left
Sitting in the water
Nobody left
Doing what they oughter
There's nothing left but the lily pad
The duck and the frog
Ran away - I'm sad
'Cause there's nobody left
Sitting in the water
Boo! Hoo! Hoo!

My Black Hen

Hickety, pickety, My black hen,
She lays eggs for the railroad men.
Sometimes one, sometiems two,
Sometimes enough
For the whole dern crew.

Cluck old hen,
Cluck, I tell you,
Cluck, old hen,
Or I’m gonna sell you.

The Rooster

The farm is in a flurry.
The rooster caught the flu.
His cock-a-doodle-doo
Has changed to cock-a doodle-choo!

Six Little Ducks

Six little ducks that I once knew,
Fat ducks, pretty ducks they were too,
But the one little duck with the feather on his back,
He led the others with his quack - quack - quack.
quack - quack - quack,
quack - quack - quack,
He led the others with his quack - quack - quack.
Down to the meadow they would go,
Wig-wag, wiggle-wag, to and fro,
But the one little duck with the feather on his back,
He led the others with his quack - quack - quack.
quack - quack - quack,
quack - quack - quack,
He led the others with his quack - quack - quack.

The Turkey

This old road is hard and bumpy
Our new turkey’s wild and jumpy.
Careful, driver, not so jerky
Or you’ll make us spill our turkey.

Turkey in the Straw

As I was a-goin' on down the road
With a tired team and a heavy load
I cracked my whip and the leader sprung
I says day-day to the wagon tongue

Chorus
Turkey in the straw (Whistle)
Turkey in the hay (Whistle)
Turkey in the straw (Whistle)
Turkey in the hay (Whistle)
Roll 'em up and twist 'em up
A high tuck a-haw
And hit 'em up a tune called
Turkey in the Straw


Went out to milk and I didn't know how
I milked the goat instead of the cow
I came to the river and I couldn't get across
So I paid five dollars for a big bay hoss
Well, he wouldn't go ahead nd he wouldn't stand still
So he went up and down like an old saw mill

Chorus

Did you ever go fishin' on a warm summer day
When all the fish were swimmin' in the bay
With their hands in their pockets and their pockets in their pants
Did you ever see a fishie do the Hootchy-Kootchy Dance?

Chorus

Cows

Betsy, the Heifer

Betsy the heifer
Queen of all the cows
She gives more milk
Than any law allows
Mornin’ she gives pasteurized
Evnin’ she gives homogenized
Betsy the heifer
Queen of all the cows.  

Took her to the county fair
...tried to win a prize.
She knew what was goin' on
I could see it in her eyes.
She looked kinda nervous
She tried so hard to please
But when I tried to milk her
All I got was cottage cheese!

The Cow

Thank you, pretty cow that made
Pleasant milk to soak my bread.
Every day and every night,
Warm and fresh and sweet and white.

Do not chew the hemlock rank,
Growing on the weedy bank;
But the yellow cowslips eat.
They will make your milk so sweet.

Where the purple violet grows,
Where the bubbling water flows,
Where the grass is fresh and fine,
Pretty cow, go there and dine.

The Cow

Robert Louis Stevenson

The friendly cow all red and white,
I love with all my heart:
She gives me cream with all her might,
To eat with apple tart.
She wanders lowing here and there,
And yet she cannot stray,
All in the pleasant open air,
The pleasant light of day;
And blown by all the winds that pass
And wet with all the showers,
She walks among the meadow grass
And eats the meadow flowers.

The Cow is of the Bovine Ilk

Ogden Nash

The cow is of the bovine ilk;
One end is moo, the other milk.

Dairy Cow Song

(to the tune of "One little, two little, three little Indians.")

Jersey, Guernsey, Ayrshire, Holstein,
These are the dairy breeds.
Dairymen take care of the cows,
On a dairy farm.

Jersey's have the highest butter fat.
Ayrshire's have the most protein.
Holstein's give the most milk.
Guernsey's are the smallest breed.

Cows that give milk are called fresh.
That means they have a calf.
Cows are milked three times a day.
On a dairy farrm.

Farmer Brown's Cow

(Could be adapted for use with Goodness, Grady . Have students use the Grady story to make up verses.)

Old Farmer Brown he had a cow,
Had a cow, had a cow,
But she got sick, I don't know how.
All she said was Moo-oo.

Chorus:
Hay, hay, hay!
Wouldn't you say
That would make it go away?
Hay, hay, hay!
Wouldn't you say
That's all for today.

Her friend, the horse, brought lemon pie,
Lemon pie, lemon pie,
To see if that would take her eye.

All she said was Moo-oo.

Repeat Chorus

The little duck brought gingerbread,
Gingerbread, gingerbread,
To see if that would clear her head.
All she said was Moo-oo.

Repeat Chorus

The farmer's dog brought cherry tart,
Cherry tart, cherry tart,
To ease the pain above her heart.
All she said was Moo-oo.

Repeat Chorus

The old black sheep brought ham and eggs,
Ham and eggs, ham and eggs,
To help her stand upon her legs.
All she said was Moo-oo.

Repeat Chorus

The rooster brought her ginger ale,
Ginger ale, ginger ale,
To keep the cow from looking pale.
All she said was Moo-oo.

Repeat Chorus

The kitten brought her apple sauce,
Apple sauce, apple sauce,
To keep the cow from feeling cross.
All she said was Moo-oo.

Repeat Chorus

The farmer's boy brought chocolate fudge,
Chocolate fudge, chocolate fudge,
But still the poor cow wouldn't budge.
All she said was Moo-oo.

Repeat Chorus

The farmer's wife brought cheese soufflé,
Cheese soufflé, cheese soufflé,
To try to chase her ills away.
All she said was Moo-oo.

Repeat Chorus

The farmer brought a load of grain,
Load of grain, load of grain,
And then she didn't have a pain.
All she said was Moo-oo.

Repeat Chorus

Now you may want to sing some more,
Sing some more, sing some more,
You'll have to write your own encore.
All she said was Moo-oo.

Repeat Chorus

Get Along, Little Dogies

In the language of the American West, a dogie is a motherless calf. The origin of the word is unknown, but author Ramon F. Adams suggested it might have originated in the 1880s, when a series of harsh winters left large numbers of orphaned calves. The little calves, weaned too early, were unable to digest coarse range grass, and their swollen bellies “very much resembled a batch of sourdough carried in a sack.” Such a calf was referred to as dough-guts. The term, altered to dogie according to Adams, “has been used ever since throughout cattleland to refer to a pot-gutted orphan calf.” ?Another possibility is that dogie is an alteration of Spanish dogal, “lariat.” Still another is that it is simply a variant pronunciation of doggie.

As I went a-walkin' one mornin' for pleasure,
I spied a cowpuncher come ridin' along;
His hat was thrown back, and his spurs were a-jinglin'
And as he approached, he was singin' this song.

Chorus:
Whoopee ti yi yo, git along, little dogies,
It's your misfortune and none of my own;
Whoopee ti yi yo, git along, little dogies,
You know that Wyoming will be your new home.

It's early in spring that we round up the dogies,
And mark 'em and brand 'em and bob off their tails;
We round up our horses and load the chuckwagon,
And then throw them dogies out onto the trail.

Repeat Chorus


It's whoopin' and yellinn and a-drivin' them dogies,
Oh, lord, how I wish that you would go on;
It's a-whoopin' and punchin' and go on-a, little dogies,
Cause you know that Wyoming is to be your new home.

Repeat Chorus

Some cowboys go up the trail just for the pleasure,
But that's where they always go gettin' it wrong,
For nobody knows just what trouble they give us,
As we start a-drivin' them all the way home.

Repeat Chorus

Pied Beauty

Gerard Manley Hopkins

Glory be to God for dappled things--
For skies of couple-colour as a brinded cow;
For rose-moles all in stipple upon trout that swim;
Fresh-firecoal chestnut-falls; finches' wings;
Landscape plotted and pieced--fold, fallow, and plough;
And all trades, their gear and tackle and trim.

All things counter, original, spare, strange;
Whatever is fickle, freckled (who knows how?)
With swift, slow; sweet, sour; adazzle, dim;
He fathers-forth whose beauty is past change:

Praise Him.

Goats and Sheep

Baa, Baa, Black Sheep

Baa, baa, black sheep, have you any wool?
Yes sir, yes sir, three bags full.

One for my master, and one for my dame
And one for the little boy who lives down the lane.

Bill Grogan's Goat

There was a man (There was a man)
Now please take note (Now please take note)
There was a man (There was a man)
Who had a goat (Who had a goat)

He loved that goat (He loved that goat)
Indeed he did (Indeed he did)
He loved that goat (He loved that goat)
Just like a kid (Just like a kid)

One day that goat (One day that goat)
Felt frisk and fine (Felt frisk and fine)

Ate three red shirts (Ate three red shirts)
Right off the line (Right off the line)
The man, he grabbed (The man, he grabbed)
Him by the back (Him by the back)
And tied him to (And tied him to)
A railroad track (A railroad track)

Now, when that train (Now, when that train)
Hove into sight (Hove into sight)
That goat grew pale (That goat grew pale)
And green with fright (And green with fright)

He heaved a sigh (He heaved a sigh)
As if in pain (As if in pain)

Coughed up those shirts (Coughed up those shirts)
And flagged the train! (And flagged the train!)

The Darby Ram

Part of an old British winter ritual, “The Darby Tup,” this song was performed by five or six singers going house to house at Christmastime. This was George Washington’s favorite song.

As I was going to Darby,
Twas on a market day.
I saw the biggest ram, sir
That ever was fed on hay.

That ram was fat behind, sir,
That ram was fat before.
It measured six yards round, sir,
And I think it was no more.

The horns upon its head, sir,
As high as a man can reach.
And there they built a pulpit,
The Quakers for to preach.

The hair upon its belly,
It reached to the ground
And sold in Darby town, sir,
For forty-seven pound.

Indeed, sir, and it’s true, sir,
I’ve never been known to lie.
And if you’d been to Darby,
You’d seen it as well as I.

Little Bo-Peep


Little Bo-Peep has lost her sheep, and cannot tell where to find them;
Let them along, and they'll come home, and bring their tails behind them.


Little Bo-Peep fell fast asleep, and dreamt she heard them bleating;
But when she awoke, she found it was false, for they were still a-fleetin

Then up she took her little crook, determined for to find them,
She found them indeed, but it made her heart bleed, for they'd left their tails behind 'em.

It happened one day, as Bo-Peep did stray into a meadow hard by,
There she espied their tails side by side, all hung on a tree to dry.

She heaved a sigh and wiped her eye, then went o'er hill and dale-o,
And did what she could, as a shepherdess should, to tack to each sheep its tail-o.


Mary Had a Little Lamb

Mary had a little lamb,
Little lamb, little lamb.
Mary had a little lamb,
Its fleece was white as snow.
And ev'rywhere that Mary went,
Mary went, Mary went
Ev'rywhere that Mary went
The lamb was sure to go.

It followed her to school one day,
School one day, school one day.
It followed her to school one day,
which was against the rules.
It made the children laugh and play,
Laugh and play, laugh and play.
It made the children laugh and play,
to see a lamb at school.

And so the teacher turned it out,
Turned it out, turned it out.
And so the teacher turned it out
But still it lingered near.
And waited patiently about,
Patiently, patiently
And waited patiently about,
'Till Mary did appear.

"Why does the lamb love Mary so?"
Mary so, Mary so.
"Why does the lamb love Mary so?"
The eager children cry.

"Why, Mary loves the lamb, you know!"
Lamb you know, lamb you know.
"Why, Mary loves the lamb, you know!"
The teacher did reply.

Mary Had a William Goat

Tune: Mary Had a Little Lamb

Oh, Mary had a William goat,
William goat, William goat,
Mary had a William goat,
And he was lined with zinc.

He followed her to school one day,
School one day, school one day,
He followed her to school one day,
And drank a pint of ink.

Oh, whoop-de-doo-den-doo-den-doo,
Doo-de-doo, doo-de-doo,
Whoop-de-doo-den-doo-den-doo,
Doo-de-doo-de-doo.

Oh, once he ate an oyster can,
Oyster can, oyster can,
Once he ate an oyster can,
Also a line of shirts.

The shirts can do no harm inside,
Harm inside, harm inside,
The shirts can do no harm inside,
But oh! The oyster can!

Oh, whoop-de-doo-den-doo-den-doo,
Doo-de-doo, doo-de-doo,
Whoop-de-doo-den-doo-den-doo,
Doo-de-doo-de-doo.

Old McDonald Had a Goat

(Have students work in groups to make up their own verses of this alternative version of Old McDonald. Students can also play Barnyard Bingo.

Old McDonald had a goat,
It ate his winter overcoat.

Old McDonald had a sheep,
It ate his big, red, four-wheeled jeep.

Old McDonald had a cat,
It ate his furry, winter hat.
Old McDonald had a goose,
It ate his can of apple juice.

Old McDonald had a duck,
It ate his new, green, pick-up truck.
Old McDonald had a cow,
It ate ten bags of puppy chow.

Old McDonald had a horse,
It ate his rubber boots, of course.

Old McDonald had a pig,
It ate his sister's brand-new wig.

Old McDonald had a dog,
It ate the farmer's catalogue.

Sheep Shearing

How delightful to see
In the evenings in spring,
The sheep going home to the fold.
The master does sing
As he views everything
And his dog goes before him when told.

The sixth month of the year,
In the month called June,
When the weather’s too hot
to be borne,
The master doth say
As he goes on his way,
“Tomorrow my sheep shall be shorn.

Now as for those sheep,
They’re delightful to see,
They’re a blessing to man on his farm.
For their flesh, it is good,
It’s the best of all food.
And the wool it will clothe us up warm.

Now the sheep they’re all shorn,
And the wool carried home.
Here’s a health to our master and flock.
And if we should stay
Till the last goes away,
I’m afraid twill be past twelve o’clock.

Horses and Mules

The Horse Went Around

Tune: Turkey In the Straw

Oh, the horse went around with his foot off the ground
Oh, the horse went around with his foot off the ground
Oh, the horse went around with his foot off the ground
Oh, the horse went around with his foot off the ground.

Same song, second verse,
A little bit faster
And a little bit worse!

Oh, the horse went around with his foot off the _____
Oh, the horse went around with his foot off the _____
Oh, the horse went around with his foot off the _____
Oh, the horse went around with his foot off the _____

Same song, third verse,
A little bit faster
And a little bit worse!

(Continue leaving off a word each verse until the whole song is sung silently. End song by repeating verse 1.)

Mules

Tune: Auld Lang Syne

On mules we find two legs behind
And two we find before
We stand behind before we find
What the two behind be for
When we're behind the two behind
We find what these be for
So stand before the two behind
Behind the two before.

Oklahoma Ag in the Classroom

Back to Food and Fun

Back to Poems and Songs