Oklahoma Ag in the Classroom

Fruity Treats

Juicy Fruit Salad / Oklaberrynana Smoothie / Yummy Yogurt Pops / Strawberry Parfait Pie / Purple Cow / Bug Juice / Raw Fruit Tart / Blackberry Sorbet / Peach Lassi Freeze / Fruit Leather

printable pdf

  • 1 c shredded apples
  • 1/2 cup diced strawberries
  • 1/3 c diced peaches
  • 1/4 c chopped grapes
  • 3/4 c orange juice
  • 1 T lemon juice
  • juice of half a grapefruit

Juicy Fruit Salad

  1. Stir the shredded apples, strawberries, peaches and chopped grapes in a medium size bowl.
  2. Pour the orange, lemon and grapefruit juice over the fruit.
  3. Stir well.

FRACTION PRACTICE

Look at the amounts of fruits and juices listed in this recipe.  Arrange the amounts from least to greatest. (answer: 1 T., ¼ c., 1/3 c., ½ c., ¾ c., 1 c.)

P.A.S.S. Math Content—Grade 3: 2.2. Grade 4: 2.3

(for one student)

  • 2 medium slices banana
  • 1/4 cup fresh or frozen berries
  • 1/2 cup vanilla yogurt
  • quart-size zip closing plastic bag
  • small cup

(for blender)

  • 1 banana
  • 1 cup frozen berries
  • 1 cup plain yogurt
  • small cup

Oklaberrynana Smoothie

Instructions for one student:

  1. Place ingredients in plastic bag.
  2. Zip tightly.
  3. Use your fingers to “puree” the mixture until berries and bananas are thoroughly mixed with the yogurt.
  4. Pour into a cup and enjoy!

Instructions to make in a blender:

  1. Place all ingredients in the blender.
  2. Puree until all the ingredients are blended.
  3. Serve in small cups.

READING RESEARCH ACTIVITY

You know strawberries are grown in Oklahoma.  Where do bananas grow?  Use an online search engine to find out. Write down the countries listed on the website you found.  Look up the locations in an atlas.

P.A.S.S. Reading Grade 3: 6.2. Grade 4: 5.2. Grade 5: 5.1

Art/Writing Activity: 3-D Berry

(Makes 10 pops)
  • two 8-oz cartons strawberry yogurt
  • one 10-oz pkg frozen strawberries, thawed
  • 10 3-oz paper cups
  • popsicle sticks

Yummy Yogurt Pops

  1. Mix yogurt and strawberries in a small bowl.
  2. Fill 10 3-oz cold drink cups 1/2 to 2/3 full.
  3. Place the cups in the freezer for about one hour.
  4. Insert wooden popsicle sticks.
  5. Freeze completely.
  6. To serve, peel off the paper cups.

PLURAL NOUNS ACTIVITY

  • Print copies of the recipe for students, or use an overhead transparency for a group project.
  • Students will find and circle all of the plural nouns in the recipe. (Ex. cups, sticks, strawberries, etc.)
  • Students will write sentences using the plural nouns. 

P.A.S.S. Reading—Grade 3: 3.1a

(recipe for two students to prepare together)

  • 1 quart-size zip-top plastic bag
  • 1 T instant pudding mix (vanilla or cheesecake flavor*
  • scant 1/4 cup milk*
  • 2-3 fresh or frozen strawberries, sliced
  • 1 rounded T whipped cream
  • four pretzels
  • two 9-ounce paper or plastic cups

*You may substitute scant 1/4 cup vanilla yogurt for the pudding mix and milk

Strawberry Parfait Pie

  1. Place all but the prezels in the plastic bag.
  2. Gently knead bag to mix.
  3. Crumble pretzels into paper cups to create crust.
  4. Clip the plastic bag at one corner.
  5. Squeeze half the strawberry mixture into each student’s cup.
  6. Top with spray whipping cream.

READING COMPARE AND CONTRAST ACTIVITY

In the story Cook-A-Doodle-Do, by Janet Stevens and Susan Stevens, Crummel, a rooster, wants to make strawberry shortcake (a plain cake with strawberries and whipped cream on top).  Other animal friends try to help and cause lots of trouble.  After several tries, they finally get it right. Compare and contrast their strawberry recipe to the one you just prepared. What things are alike?  What was different?  Did your team have trouble, like the characters in the book, or did it go smoothly?

P.A.S.S. Reading—Grade 2: 6.2. Grade 3: 5.2a. Grade 4: 4.2

  • vanilla ice cream
  • grape juice

Purple Cow

  1. For each student, put two scoops of vanilla ice cream in a glass.
  2. Pour grape juice over it.

WRITING ACTIVITY

Why is this recipe called “Purple Cow?”  How do you think the drink was invented?  Do you think there is a story behind it?  If you were asked to invent a new drink recipe, what ingredients would you add?  Write your new recipe.

P.A.S.S. Writing—Grades 2-4: 2

(10 servings)

  • 2 10-oz. pkgs.
    frozen strawberries,
    defrosted
  • 1 6-oz. can lemonade
    concentrated, thawed
  • 1 quart ginger ale
  • 2 cups raisins
  • 6 gummy worms
  • blender
  • punch bowl

Bug Juice

  1. Mix the strawberries and lemonade concentrate in a blender
    until smooth and thick.
  2. Gradually add ginger ale.
  3. Transfer the mixture to a punch bowl.
  4. Stir in any remaining ginger ale and the raisins.
  5. Place the gummy worms on the rim of the bowl for a swampy effect.

SUBSTITUTE PHONEME CHANGE ACTIVITY

After students have prepared and tasted the bug juice, write the word “bug” on the board.  Ask students to take turns coming to the board to replace the letter you tell them, then read the new word aloud.  Examples: Change the b to an r = rug. Change the g to a b = rub. Add a g at the beginning = grub. Change the u to an a = grab. Take off the g and change the a to i = rib.

P.A.S.S. Reading—Grade 1: 2.6. Grade 2: 1.1b

  • 1 cup finely chopped pecans
  • 1 cup dates, pitted and chopped fine
  • 1 cup flaked coconut
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla
  • 1/2 cup dried cherries
  • sliced bananas and other sliced fresh fruit, such as watermelon, strawberries, peaches, grapes, blueberries, etc.

Raw Fruit Tart

  1. Plump the dried cherries and dates in a little warm water. Drain the water and reserve. Add the nuts, coconut, cinnamon and vanilla, and then mix, adding enough of the reserved water to make a thick paste to serve as the crust.
  2. Flatten the mixture into a tart pan, or make several several smaller tarts by pressing a ball of the mixture into a circle on smaller plates.
  3. Add a layer of sliced bananas and gently press. Decorate by adding sliced fresh fruit on top. Refrigerate at least one hour.

Makes 6-8 servings

  • 4 c whole, frozen blackberries
  • 2-3 T water
  • up to 1/4 cup honey or sugar

Blackberry Sorbet

  1. Allow the frozen blackberries to thaw for about 15-20 minutes.
  2. After 20 minutes, combine blackberry, water and honey or sugar in a food processor or blender.
  3. Pulse repeatedly to break up the berries, then process or blend until the sorbet is smooth.
  4. Serve immediately. If the sorbet is too soft, pour it into a container and freeze for a few hours, stirring periodically to break up ice crystals.

Serves 4

  • 3 fresh peaches, chopped, or 3 cups sliced frozen peaches
  • 1/2 cup ice
  • 1/2 cup plain or vanilla yogurt
  • juice from one orange

Peach Lassi Freeze

  1. Place ingredients in a blender and blend until smooth.
  2. Serve immediately.
  • cookie sheet
  • plastic wrap
  • tape
  • small pieces of fruit—apple, grape, peach, plum, apricot, etc.

Fruit Leather

  1. Line a cookie sheet with a plastic wrap and tape the edges. (Do not use wax paper or aluminum foil.)
  2. Place small pieces of fruit in a blender. Puree until smooth and thin enough to pour. (Some fruits, like apples and grapes, make a smoother puree if they are cooked with a little water first.)
  3. Pour onto the prepared cookie sheet. Tilt pan to spread evently until it is 1/8- to 1/4-inch thick. Leave at least 1 onch around the edges so the plastic wrap can be removed. Make smaller pieces of fruit leather by pouring puree into small “pancakes.”
  4. Dry the fruit leather in a warm oven (140 degrees). Leave the door open 2 to 6 inches. Fruit will dry in 4 to 6 hours. If the oven is too hot, it will begin to cook the fruit. If it is too cool, it may not dry fast enough.
  5. Dry it until it is still rubbery. The center should not be sticky. Remove the leather from the tray while it is still warm. Peel away the plastic wrap, and roll up the leather.
  6. Wrap the leather in plastic or put it in an airtight bag or container.

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Oklahoma Ag in the Classroom

Oklahoma Ag in the Classroom is a program of the Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service, the Oklahoma Department of Agriculture, Food and Forestry and the Oklahoma State Department of Education.