Oklahoma Ag in the Classroom

Biscuits

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Mothers Biscuits (poem by Freda Quenneville)

The word biscuit is from the Latin phrase biscuctus which means baked (bis) twice (cuctus).

(7-8 biscuits)

  • 1 cup flour
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 2 tablespoons shortening
  • 6 tablespoons milk
  • mixing bowl
  • sifter
  • fork
  • measuring spoons
  • measuring cups
  • biscuit cutter, small cup or cookie cutters in geometric
    shapes

Biscuits

  1. Measure and sift flour, salt, and baking powder into bowl.
  2. Measure and add shortening.
  3. Cut the shortening into the flour with a fork.
  4. Make a hole in the mixture, and pour in milk.
  5. Stir LIGHTLY until dough holds together. (Note: excessive handling will make the biscuits tough.)
  6. Cover work area with waxed paper.
  7. Turn dough out on lightly floured waxed paper.
  8. Pat dough out until 1/2 inch thick.
  9. Cut with biscuit cutter, cup or cookie cutters.
  10. Bake at 450 degrees for 12-15 minutes.

(12-16 biscuits)

  • 2 cups flour
  • 1 tablespoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 cup mashed sweet potatoes (from 1-2 cooked sweet potatoes)
  • 2 tablespoons firmly packed brown sugar
  • 1/2 cup butter or shortening, melted
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 3/4 cup buttermilk

Sweet Potato Biscuits

  1. Heat oven to 425 degrees. Combine flour, baking powder and salt in a large bowl.
  2. Combine sweet potato, sugar and butter or shortening until well blended and fluffy.
  3. Dissolve baking soda in buttermilk. Stir buttermilk and sweet potato mixture alternately into dry ingredients until they are just combined. (Do not overmix.)
  4. Roll or pat dough 1/2 inch thick on floured counter or pastry board. Cut with floured round cutter or drinking glass. Please on ungreased baking sheet. Bake for 15-20 minutes.

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Oklahoma Ag in the Classroom

Oklahoma Ag in the Classroom is a program of the Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service, Oklahoma Department of Agriculture, Food and Forestry and the Oklahoma State Department of Education